History

The roots of MCV date back to 1964 when a group of 42 young Americans answered the call of their president John F Kennedy. “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country”.

One of the 42 was Kevin Denny, assigned to the Mangochi District of Malawi.

Fast forward to 1992! Kevin, now a Doctor and child psychiatrist met Chakunja Sibale, a clinical officer at Malindi Hospital. A beginning seed was planted. In 1997 Kevin asked Mr. Sibale what was in place for children orphaned by HIV/AIDS. They began a discussion of what to do about these children. There was nothing available in the country. Mr. Sibale had an idea to help a few orphans, but had no resources. Kevin responded that together they could make something happen. To start Kevin could send $100 and then $150 every month to support Mr. Sibale’s efforts.

Kevin turned to his Peace Corps friends from the 64 era, plus he contacted the Friends of Malawi”, a nonprofit, largely made up of returned Peace Corps Volunteers (PCV’s) from Malawi.

That same year Mr. Sibale was sponsored by the Ministry of Health to come to the US for a maternal and child health conference. After the meeting Kevin took him to meet two old Peace Corp friends Garry Prime and Michael Hill. Both were impressed with Sibale’s vision, energy, and capability. Garry made Sibale an offer. He would guarantee his salary for one year if Sibale would quit his current job and work full time on developing the Malawi Children’s Village. If the idea did not work out, Garry would guarantee another 6 months of salary while Sibale looked for another job. It was trust and the spirit of giving back to Malawi for what this country has meant and given to all of us who had worked there as PVC’s.

The vision materialized and the rest is history. Along the way Kevin developed a MCV USA and recruited more retuned Malawi PCV’s, others who had volunteered in Malawi and multiple Rotary Clubs who have provided the USA funding and Leadership.

In Malawi, Mr. Sibale established a leadership team, a Malawian Non Government Organization (NGO), and developed the program that is in place today.

Since the beginning approximately 6000 orphans have been served. The earliest supported orphans are now becoming teachers, clinical officers, agricultural extension officers and more. They would not have had a chance.

Sibale’s vision from 1967 has become a reality.

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